Berkeley's Polypore

Berkeley's Polypore

 

Bondarzewia berkeleyi Scientific name:   Bondarzewia berkeleyi (Fr.) Bondartsev & Singer Derivation of name:   Bondarzewia is named for A.S. Bondarzew; berkeleyi is named for British mycologist M. J. Berkeley (1803-1889). Synonymy:  Polyporus berkeleyi Fr. Common names:   Berkeley's polypore. Phylum:   Basidiomycota Order:   Russulales Family:   Bondarzewiaceae Occurrence on wood substrate: Parasitic and saprophytic; at the base of oaks and other living deciduous trees,  around decaying stumps or from buried roots; July through October. Dimensions:  The entire rosette of overlapping caps may be a meter or more across.  Upper surface:  Creamy white to yellowish to tan, somewhat zonate; dry; hairy or not.       Pore surface: Whitish, becoming dingy; pores large (0.5-2 mm), portions of the pore surface may appear maze-like. Edibility: Edible when young, bitter with age. Comments: Berkeley's polypore causes a butt rot of living trees. When young, the flesh exudes a white latex. When it first emerges from the ground it looks like a collection of thick, irregular knobby fingers. The "fingers" expand into overlapping shelves.

 


Bondarzewia berkeleyi


Scientific name: Bondarzewia berkeleyi (Fr.)
Bondartsev & Singer
Derivation of name: Bondarzewia is named for A.S.
Bondarzew; berkeleyi is named for British mycologist
M. J. Berkeley (1803-1889).
Synonymy: Polyporus berkeleyi Fr.
Common names: Berkeley's polypore.
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Order: Russulales
Family: Bondarzewiaceae
Occurrence on wood substrate: Parasitic and saprophytic;
at the base of oaks and other living deciduous trees, around
decaying stumps or from buried roots; July through October.
Dimensions: The entire rosette of overlapping caps may be
a meter or more across.
Upper surface: Creamy white to yellowish to tan,
somewhat zonate; dry; hairy or not.
Pore surface: Whitish, becoming dingy; pores large (0.5-2
mm), portions of the pore surface may appear maze-like.
Edibility: Edible when young, bitter with age.
Comments: Berkeley's polypore causes a butt rot of living
trees. When young, the flesh exudes a white latex. When it
first emerges from the ground it looks like a collection of
thick, irregular knobby fingers. The "fingers" expand into
overlapping shelves.